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I see a US World Chess Champion on the Horizon


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#16
Rybka

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How many sportswriters or fans know that Texas Tech besides being an ncaa basketball powerhouse, is also a collegiate chess powerhouse?

 

History

The Knight Raiders Chess Club was founded in 2003 by Hal Karlsson, Associate Professor of Geosciences, with the goal to promote chess at Texas Tech University as well as in the community. The Texas Tech Chess Program, housed under the Division of Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion, was developed in 2007 and since then has captured more than ten national titles, as well as regional and state championships. In both 2011 and 2012, The Texas Tech University Chess Team has brought home the National Collegiate Team Championship. In 2014, Tech made history by receiving a double honor from the U.S. Chess Federation; Texas Tech University was named Chess College of the Year while Head Coach and Director Alex Onischuk was recognized as Grandmaster of the Year. In 2018, Director Onischuk was inducted into the Chess Hall of Fame.

In December of 2015 the Texas Tech, Chess Team won the 2015 Pan-American Intercollegiate Chess Championship for the first time in program history. The Texas Tech Chess Team has qualified for The Final Four for the years 2010-2012 and 2014-2018.



#17
Rybka

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Baku, location of today's Europa final, is well known in Chess circles. Garry Kasparov, generally considered the greatest of all time, was born and raised in Baku. Will he be at the game?



#18
JBigjake54

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Garry Kasparov ... was born and raised in Baku.
Will he be at the game?


His mother was Armenian.
He now lives in NYC & used a Croatian passport.
So, highly doubtful.

We are good enough to beat the best teams, and bad enough to lose to the worst teams. 


#19
JBigjake54

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Cheater!
https://nypost.com/2...ing-tournament/
Photo suggests that he hid the phone in his sock, perhaps with a shield from metal detectors used at these tournaments.

We are good enough to beat the best teams, and bad enough to lose to the worst teams. 


#20
betoAYAK

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Cheater!
https://nypost.com/2...ing-tournament/

Here's another article about this loser https://bleacherrepo...paign=editorial


You're a fucking monkey.
QUOTE (NittanyMetros @ Mar 17 2011, 01:38 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It seems Philly fans have signed up on metrofanatic to vote for themselves (in 'What team do you hate more?') . No real fan of this team would vote anything other than DC.

#21
ig101

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Cheater!
https://nypost.com/2...ing-tournament/

Funny but would taking a photo or video in the restroom would be a violation of privacy?  What if he was pooping big?



#22
Rybka

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He is not the first player caught cheating using a computer chess program for assistance during a match. But I think he is the highest rated player ever caught. As one of the articles indicates, his big rise in ratings, at his age, tipped off the investigators for FIDE (the chess equivalent of FIFA). It is a credit to FIDE that he was caught, legal issues aside.

 

This matter also shows the power of computer chess. Nowadays there is a whole new type of computer chess program that is challenging the established type. It is known at "neural network" and is based on artificial intelligence.

 

And one more note, the father of computer chess, Alan Turing is receiving some more well-deserved recognition for his work during WW2 and for developing computers. Turing was one of the most important scientists of the 20th century, but is virtually unknown due to circumstances.

 

https://www.bbc.com/...siness-48962557



#23
JBigjake54

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would taking a photo or video in the restroom ... be a violation of privacy?


I would hope so! Even in France!
Has the photog been IDed?
Difficult to make a case without a suspect.

We are good enough to beat the best teams, and bad enough to lose to the worst teams. 


#24
Rybka

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Shelby Lyman, the PBS tv host of the great Fischer-Spassky match of 1972, passed away this past August. Only Fischer did more to popularize chess in the US. Like Fischer, he was originally from Brooklyn.

 

I read several tributes to his life. This one from the "Atlantic" is one of the best:

 

Another chess master who was central to the Fischer story also died last month: Shelby Lyman. Though not a world-class player, Lyman did more to popularize chess in America than anyone not named Bobby Fischer. He was teaching chess in New York when one of his students, a TV executive, tapped him to host a PBS show covering the Fischer-Spassky match. Lyman proved a natural showman, explaining densely complicated chess positions to TV viewers, many of whom thought of a fork only as an eating utensil. (In chess, it’s a move where a single piece makes at least two simultaneous attacks.) Like tons of other kids at the time, I’d turn to Channel 13 in New York that summer and follow Lyman’s commentary move by move, sparking a lifelong interest in the game. After becoming a journalist, I wrote about Lyman, and from time to time we’d talk about the match.

“I had no concept of TV,” he told me. “I never watched television. I had no idea how a talk show host should act.” But, he added, “chess is a dramatic event. You could hear the swords clang on the shields with every move. They went at each other. The average person is turned onto chess when it’s presented right. Trying to figure out the next move is a fascinating adventure—an adventure people can get into.”

With his bushy brown hair and endearing miscues (in that low-tech era, he’d fumble for the pieces he used to shove onto demonstration boards), Lyman became a mini-celebrity, while interest in the ancient game boomed. In the year before the match, membership in the U.S. Chess Federation was about 27,000. A year after Fischer won the title, it had more than doubled, to about 59,000. “Shelby was the face of chess in America,” Bruce Pandolfini, the coach and author who was played by the actor Ben Kingsley in the movie Searching for Bobby Fischer, told me.






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