Jump to content

Harrison and NYRB


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1
msilverstein47`

msilverstein47`

    Reserve Team

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 336 posts
  • Supports:NPSL

http://njmonthly.com...-red-bulls.html

 

The outcome of Harrison’s stadium gamble remains equally fuzzy. In exchange for the town’s $40 million investment, the Red Bulls agreed to pay just $1 a year rent, plus $125,000 in payments in lieu of property taxes, or PILOTs. (The team received a full property-tax exemption, though this is currently tied up in legal issues.) The rest of the city’s payback was to come out of PILOT payments from new hotels and apartments that would accompany the stadium.

Thanks in part to the economic downturn, construction around the stadium started slow, with dire effects on city revenue. In 2011, Harrison’s bond rating sunk as low as Detroit’s. In fact, all of the new suburban soccer stadiums provided weak initial returns on taxpayer spending. The Philadelphia Inquirer last year described Philadelphia Union’s new PPL Park in suburban Chester as “an island among vacant land and dilapidated buildings.” Bridgeview, the Illinois town that became home to the Fire, is facing millions of dollars in debt and a tumbling credit rating.

At least in Harrison, the development tide has begun to turn. The Water’s Edge luxury rental complex and Element hotel opened last fall, and three more housing developments are under way. James Fife, who took over as Harrison mayor after Town Hall fixture Raymond McDonough died of a heart attack at his desk in February 2014, notes that Moody’s Investors Services raised the town’s bond rating out of junk status in September and says annual PILOT payments on new buildings are now enough to cover the stadium bond debt. “As of right now, anything that comes online is money that goes directly to the town.”
 



#2
RedBullsFC

RedBullsFC

    First Team

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,461 posts
  • Location:Hackensack, NJ
  • Supports:club: NYRB/////country: USA

So according to  the article the town is turning the leaf on that bond debt uh?



#3
irishapple21

irishapple21

    Player/Manager

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,840 posts
I never had any doubt this would work out just fine. Pretty soon, Harrison is going to be a second Hoboken.

#4
MikeV

MikeV

    Player/Manager

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,833 posts
  • Location:Astoria, Queens
  • Supports:Metros

I never had any doubt this would work out just fine. Pretty soon, Harrison is going to be a second Hoboken.

 

Overpriced and full of suburban bros who want to pretend they live in the city for 3 years?



#5
Pebble

Pebble

    insightful, deep and most creative

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,450 posts
  • Location:Jersey City
  • Supports:Metros, Rangers FC, #RedBullOut

I never had any doubt this would work out just fine. Pretty soon, Harrison is going to be a second Hoboken.

 

Harrison is not going to be Hoboken. It'll be nicer and the area around the stadium will be filled with crappily built condos and apartments for people that can't afford Jersey City or Hoboken. Mind you, I've also advocated for people to purchase homes in Harrison with the idea of the properties increasing in value. The problem is, once you get beyond the new PATH construction, the buildings are ugly post-war homes that don't have the draw. 

 

Overpriced and full of suburban bros who want to pretend they live in the city for 3 years?

 

Hoboken's scene isn't my thing, but I'd take the architecture and restaurants of Hoboken over just about any area of Queens and Brooklyn. Broboken might love its fist-pumping nightclubs, but it is actually a good, clean city...


#RedBullOut

 

Thursday, November 27, 2008 -

After another Hatch shank over the crossbar...
"And Hatch wonders why nobody is covering him." - Tony Meola


#6
MikeV

MikeV

    Player/Manager

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,833 posts
  • Location:Astoria, Queens
  • Supports:Metros

 

 

 

Hoboken's scene isn't my thing, but I'd take the architecture and restaurants of Hoboken over just about any area of Queens and Brooklyn. Broboken might love its fist-pumping nightclubs, but it is actually a good, clean city...

 

Any area in all of Queens and Brooklyn? Really? 



#7
Pebble

Pebble

    insightful, deep and most creative

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,450 posts
  • Location:Jersey City
  • Supports:Metros, Rangers FC, #RedBullOut

 

Any area in all of Queens and Brooklyn? Really? 

 

Just about any... Hoboken is more "New York" than a lot of areas in Queens and Brooklyn. Having the "NJ" moniker next to the name doesn't make it lesser in value, only psychologically. Can you honestly state that Forrest Hills, an area entirely dependent upon the automobile, and filled with an array of post-war homes is as nice as Hoboken, which is filled with brownstones (mostly because every brownstone building obtained its stone from New Jersey including every building in NY which is why you don't really see brownstones far into Queens or deep into Brooklyn) and has a meticulous building plan department that requires that new structures meet the standards of look and imagery with the rest of the city.

 

Jamaica is dump and not remotely comparable. Elmhurst is passable, at best, but has nothing close to the amenities. Can you say that Flatbush is as nice? The only reason anyone even lives there is to claim they "live in The City" or that they live in Brooklyn. Heck, their commute to anywhere in Manhattan is a heck of a lot longer than Hoboken. 

 

Not everything in New York City is better because it is in New York City. The same options are available elsewhere. 

 

Besides, it is a bit pretentious to make the claim that one person is more "New York" than another based upon a zip code. Is the Hoboken resident that doesn't own a car, commutes to his job via train less "New York" than the person living in Flushing who does the same thing but has a longer train ride to Manhattan? That seems a bit silly to me... 


#RedBullOut

 

Thursday, November 27, 2008 -

After another Hatch shank over the crossbar...
"And Hatch wonders why nobody is covering him." - Tony Meola


#8
MikeV

MikeV

    Player/Manager

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,833 posts
  • Location:Astoria, Queens
  • Supports:Metros

 

Just about any... Hoboken is more "New York" than a lot of areas in Queens and Brooklyn. Having the "NJ" moniker next to the name doesn't make it lesser in value, only psychologically. Can you honestly state that Forrest Hills, an area entirely dependent upon the automobile, and filled with an array of post-war homes is as nice as Hoboken, which is filled with brownstones (mostly because every brownstone building obtained its stone from New Jersey including every building in NY which is why you don't really see brownstones far into Queens or deep into Brooklyn) and has a meticulous building plan department that requires that new structures meet the standards of look and imagery with the rest of the city.

 

Jamaica is dump and not remotely comparable. Elmhurst is passable, at best, but has nothing close to the amenities. Can you say that Flatbush is as nice? The only reason anyone even lives there is to claim they "live in The City" or that they live in Brooklyn. Heck, their commute to anywhere in Manhattan is a heck of a lot longer than Hoboken. 

 

Not everything in New York City is better because it is in New York City. The same options are available elsewhere. 

 

Besides, it is a bit pretentious to make the claim that one person is more "New York" than another based upon a zip code. Is the Hoboken resident that doesn't own a car, commutes to his job via train less "New York" than the person living in Flushing who does the same thing but has a longer train ride to Manhattan? That seems a bit silly to me... 

 

I'm not even sure how to respond to any of this because writing off the two biggest boroughs in NYC as not as New York as Hoboken is sort of absurd. In fact it sort of proves the point. New York doesn't mean Manhattan. In fact these days large parts of Manhattan are inhabited by ultra rich people with multiple homes, finance bros and rich kids whose parents are paying for their rent so they can experience the city for 4 years after college. Maybe Hoboken is the more like that version of the city than Brooklyn and Queens if that's what you mean.

 

I live in Astoria which has long standing ethnic neighborhoods (with insanely good restaurants) alongside newish bars and restaurants. I pay significantly less rent than I would in Hoboken. While people complain about the influx of people like me to Astoria it still feels very much like an old school neighborhood. I plan to live here for a while, not eke out a living paying some ludicrous rent so I can say I lived in a hip neighborhood when I move back to the suburbs. I won't even attempt to make the argument for other neighborhoods because despite being here for 5 years I've only just scratched the surface when it comes to getting to know different neighborhoods. No offense, but I feel like you may not know enough about the two boroughs to write them off completely. 

 

I wasn't even coming out that much against Hoboken, I'm sure there are people there who don't suck that know places that don't suck. 



#9
Pebble

Pebble

    insightful, deep and most creative

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,450 posts
  • Location:Jersey City
  • Supports:Metros, Rangers FC, #RedBullOut

 

I'm not even sure how to respond to any of this because writing off the two biggest boroughs in NYC as not as New York as Hoboken is sort of absurd. In fact it sort of proves the point. New York doesn't mean Manhattan. In fact these days large parts of Manhattan are inhabited by ultra rich people with multiple homes, finance bros and rich kids whose parents are paying for their rent so they can experience the city for 4 years after college. Maybe Hoboken is the more like that version of the city than Brooklyn and Queens if that's what you mean.

 

I live in Astoria which has long standing ethnic neighborhoods (with insanely good restaurants) alongside newish bars and restaurants. I pay significantly less rent than I would in Hoboken. While people complain about the influx of people like me to Astoria it still feels very much like an old school neighborhood. I plan to live here for a while, not eke out a living paying some ludicrous rent so I can say I lived in a hip neighborhood when I move back to the suburbs. I won't even attempt to make the argument for other neighborhoods because despite being here for 5 years I've only just scratched the surface when it comes to getting to know different neighborhoods. No offense, but I feel like you may not know enough about the two boroughs to write them off completely. 

 

I wasn't even coming out that much against Hoboken, I'm sure there are people there who don't suck that know places that don't suck. 

 

My point was that you were sort of snubbing your nose at Hoboken residents that "think they live in New York." While their taxes are paid in NJ, their lifestyle and attitude is no different than any resident of New York. The television stations are exactly the same. The buildings they live in were largely built with the same materials. The size of their apartments are about the same (possibly a little larger in Hoboken). 

 

These people aren't less "New York" than someone in Forrest Hills or Flushing or Astoria. 

 

Nobody says there aren't good restaurants in those areas either. They do have great places to go. But there are just as many options in Hoboken. 

 

Just to prove one other item I mentioned, I went randomly through Hoboken, Queens and Brooklyn just clicking on the street view. In Hoboken, i took areas that are far away from the PATH along with those close, avoiding main streets in both since that would only release commercial buildings. Here is the fun I had...

 
Now, if you can't see that every area of Hoboken, which basically looks like those shots above, is better than many areas of Brooklyn and Queens, I don't know what to tell you. 
 
As for cost, I'm in agreement with you. I don't own in Hoboken. I bought in Jersey City instead. We have the same hipster outlets like Talde and Barcade that exist over in Williamsburg. Only difference is, I can walk to the Statue of Liberty while hearing people tell me I'm not as cool as those Brooklynites... 
 
Regardless, we've veered wildly off course. The reality is that Harrison will not be Hoboken. It'll be a landing spot for those that can't afford JC or Hoboken. It'll have some amenities but it'll be more in line with the chains like Five Guys, Dunkin Donuts, Chiles, etc, than say an Arthur's Steakhouse or Roman Nose. 

#RedBullOut

 

Thursday, November 27, 2008 -

After another Hatch shank over the crossbar...
"And Hatch wonders why nobody is covering him." - Tony Meola


#10
UpstateFan

UpstateFan

    First Team

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,884 posts
  • Supports:NY Red Bulls

 

 

My point was that you were sort of snubbing your nose at Hoboken residents that "think they live in New York." While their taxes are paid in NJ, their lifestyle and attitude is no different than any resident of New York. The television stations are exactly the same. The buildings they live in were largely built with the same materials. The size of their apartments are about the same (possibly a little larger in Hoboken). 

 

These people aren't less "New York" than someone in Forrest Hills or Flushing or Astoria. 

 

Nobody says there aren't good restaurants in those areas either. They do have great places to go. But there are just as many options in Hoboken. 

 

Just to prove one other item I mentioned, I went randomly through Hoboken, Queens and Brooklyn just clicking on the street view. In Hoboken, i took areas that are far away from the PATH along with those close, avoiding main streets in both since that would only release commercial buildings. Here is the fun I had...

 
Now, if you can't see that every area of Hoboken, which basically looks like those shots above, is better than many areas of Brooklyn and Queens, I don't know what to tell you. 
 
As for cost, I'm in agreement with you. I don't own in Hoboken. I bought in Jersey City instead. We have the same hipster outlets like Talde and Barcade that exist over in Williamsburg. Only difference is, I can walk to the Statue of Liberty while hearing people tell me I'm not as cool as those Brooklynites... 
 
Regardless, we've veered wildly off course. The reality is that Harrison will not be Hoboken. It'll be a landing spot for those that can't afford JC or Hoboken. It'll have some amenities but it'll be more in line with the chains like Five Guys, Dunkin Donuts, Chiles, etc, than say an Arthur's Steakhouse or Roman Nose. 

 

I'd agree with most of this, including what Harrison (Stadium district) will eventually look like...but at least it's a short walk to the iron bound, which has pretty good eating options IMHO. 



#11
vflkirwan

vflkirwan

    Player/Manager

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,065 posts
  • Location:North Jersey
  • Supports:Metro/VfL Wolfsburg und die US Boys

My ship has sailed as I'm too old  but I would have looked to live in Harrison during my early to mid 20s if Red Bull Arena was right there.......



#12
onionsack

onionsack

    Dir. of Football Operations

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,765 posts
  • Location:New York CIty
  • Supports:New York Cosmos

 

 

Hoboken's scene isn't my thing, but I'd take the architecture and restaurants of Hoboken over just about any area of Queens and Brooklyn. Broboken might love its fist-pumping nightclubs, but it is actually a good, clean city...

 

Where do you go out in Hoboken, i lived there 7 years and the only people going to the 2 or 3 guido bars are out of towners and B&T crowd. Its is 30 something singles and yuppies and young family crowd and the bars all cater to that.


RED BULL OUT!!! - True Soccer fans in NY since 2006

#13
Pebble

Pebble

    insightful, deep and most creative

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,450 posts
  • Location:Jersey City
  • Supports:Metros, Rangers FC, #RedBullOut

 

Where do you go out in Hoboken, i lived there 7 years and the only people going to the 2 or 3 guido bars are out of towners and B&T crowd. Its is 30 something singles and yuppies and young family crowd and the bars all cater to that.

 

Two or three bars...? Seriously? Every restaurant/bar turns into a raging nightclub! Mulligans is a standard bar. Once it hits about 8, they open the back room and it's fist-pumping time. The biergarten that was put in recently does the exact same thing in the evening. It's hall becomes a nightclub. Havana Cafe and Lounge spills crowds outside. The Dubliner is another spot... I just named four for you. 

 

I don't go out in Hoboken as that just isn't my scene. I agree that there are definitely a lot of restaurants that cater to its young families and its non-Bro residents. However, Broboken earned it's name. As much as people like to claim its all out of towners, it really isn't. 


#RedBullOut

 

Thursday, November 27, 2008 -

After another Hatch shank over the crossbar...
"And Hatch wonders why nobody is covering him." - Tony Meola


#14
SatansHockey

SatansHockey

    Player/Manager

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4,115 posts
  • Supports:New York Red Bulls
Not trying to be n asshole but is there any reason why you use that colored font? Your posts are miserable to read cause of it.

#15
GMoney

GMoney

    Dir. of Football Operations

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,118 posts
  • Supports:New York Red Bulls

 

 

Not everything in New York City is better because it is in New York City. The same options are available elsewhere. 

 

 

 

Being a native NY'er, that's blasphemy!  Everything in NY is better and NJ isn't taken seriously.  Actually, NJ is like the dirty kid in school who everyone said had the "cooties."  If it touches NJ, it's automatically is gross.

 

 

Yes, this is a trolling post.  But in reality, many NY'ers actually feel this way weather it's fair or not.


The New York Red Bulls previously kicked around Major League Soccer as the MetroStars with limited success. But after transforming under a new banner in 2005, the Red Bulls have become a force to be reckoned with in the Eastern Conference. The club has made leaps of progress since its previous incarnation and now has its focus on bringing the league title to New York. Grab your New York Red Bulls soccer jersey and other gear here at MLSGear.com.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users